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Abuse Critical Race Theory Critical Theory History Homosexuality Intersectionality Methodology Missions New Liberalism Racism SBC Author Scripture Social Justice

Does the SBC Need Another Conservative Resurgence (and Podcast)? with Chris Bolt

On this maiden voyage of the new CR:V Podcast site founder Chris Bolt sets down with Jeff Wright to talk about the doctrinal state of the Southern Baptist Convention, whether or not she needs another Conservative Resurgence, and what this new podcast is all about, anyway.

Find it on Apple Podcasts or by clicking here.

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Uncategorized

The Fuller Controversy and The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

This post contains the original videos (in order) from Jon Harris and The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary pertaining to the Fuller Controversy.

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Dominick S. Hernández

 

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Jonathan T. Pennington

 

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Jarvis J. Williams

Matthew J. Hall

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SBC Author

Doctrinal Evolution (Jonathan Leeman)

In this Twitter thread, Jonathan Leeman warns of how, when we undergo doctrinal drift, “people outside of us began to notice a shift in tone and emphases. If they say something, our initial response can be defensive. ‘I haven’t changed. Look, same doctrines!’ Yet something has changed. Our sympathies and intuitions are no longer what they were.”

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History Methodology SBC Author

The Current Drift of the Evangelical World in North America (Mark Coppenger)

On this episode of The Sword and the Trowel, “Dr. Coppenger shares his insight as an elder statesman into the the current state of the Evangelical world in North America.”

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Methodology

On How We Speak of Sin

In a 2013 essay, Thabiti Anyabwile wrote regarding same-sex marriage, “Turns out that being civil about indecency actually hurts the traditional cause.” His point was that polite discourse about abominable behavior plays a role in normalizing such behavior. It is not difficult to see why that would be the case. Polite discourse minimizes and, over time, neutralizes the instinct of moral revulsion. While moral revulsion alone is not enough to sustain ethical practice over time, it is an important community-shaping element. Healthy communities express moral revulsion at that which is truly abominable, and the healthy effect of such revulsion is a natural deterrent toward said behavior within the community. People who are socialized into being appalled at what is appalling to God have the blessing of a moral compass shaped according to truth. Anyabwile’s “gag reflex” argument highlights an important component of the effects of our discourse about sin. It is entirely possible to speak of sin in a way that is technically correct, while still lacking entirely in true moral fiber, leading to the further erosion of social norms and the withering away of a protective moral revulsion.

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Abuse Critical Theory Gender Scripture

Women Preachers in the Southern Baptist Convention: We Should Be Worried (Part 1)

There’s a common misconception going around in some circles that anyone who professes Christ yet believes women can be called to the pastorate or preach to men cannot be a true Christian. This is demonstrably untrue. When people believe that women can be preachers called by God it doesn’t necessarily mean those people aren’t Christian, it just means they’re wrong.

But what do the churches of the Southern Baptist Convention think? Southern Baptists reached an agreement about this issue a long time ago and they believe it’s not only theologically incorrect to have women preach, but sinful for women to take up the role of preaching as it goes against explicit commands given in God’s word. This is why women preaching in the Southern Baptist Convention is such an obviously divisive issue.

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Methodology

Punching Right While Slipping Left

If we care about conservative theology, then we will take care to hold our own ‘side’ accountable regarding orthodoxy and orthopraxy, as a bare minimum. But sometimes, holding our brothers and sisters accountable comes about through difficult words of rebuke. As Proverbs 27:6 reminds us, “Faithful are the wounds of a friend; profuse are the kisses of an enemy.” Other times, we merely provide some push back. And in some instances, a little humor might not be a bad idea.

Note that humor is softer than pushback, and that is as it should be. But biting humor often evidences hidden hatred within the heart of the one delivering rebuke. Enter, then, those who claim to be theologically conservative by holding their own side accountable. Some who do so spend much of their time punching right. One may also find them using humor of the more hateful variety. That is, they engage in mocking and scoffing more than they do in thinking, and they do so while punching right, which is in and of itself an evidence of sliding to the left.

By all means, have the integrity to question and correct your conservative co-belligerents. But be one, too. If we love the conservative cause, because we love the glory of Christ, and love people, then we will not constantly seek to demonize others through laughter, even when they become an embarrassment to us. All of us make mistakes and need correction, but it is also a mistake to be ashamed of our conservatism.

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Complementarianism Methodology Scripture

A Quick and Dirty Critique of Al Mohler’s “A Call for Theological Triage and Christian Maturity”

R. Albert Mohler, Jr. writes, “theological seriousness and maturity demand that we consider doctrinal issues in terms of their relative importance. God’s truth is to be defended at every point and in every detail, but responsible Christians must determine which issues deserve first-rank attention in a time of theological crisis.” We can understand this claim to refer to different areas of doctrine. For example, Mohler writes, “Third-order issues are doctrines over which Christians may disagree and remain in close fellowship, even within local congregations. I would put most of the debates over eschatology, for example, in this category.” But if someone claims Jesus already returned, physically, shouldn’t that eschatological issue be categorized as a first-level theological issue? Alternatively, Mohler allows room for disagreement over something he would categorize as a first-level theological issue, like the doctrine of the Trinity, at least with respect to, for example, the affirmation or denial of the eternal functional subordination of the Son.

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Critical Race Theory Critical Theory Intersectionality SBC Author Scripture Social Justice

BREAKING: Q&A with the 2019 Resolutions Committee about Resolution 9

In this article, “members of the 2019 Resolutions Committee sought to shed light on both their purpose in addressing the topic and the process by which the resolution was developed, with the goal of clarifying any misconceptions.”

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Christology SBC Author

The Glory of the Cross (Stephen Wellum)

In this article, Stephen J. Wellum writes, “It would be an understatement to say that penal substitution has come under attack today. From voices outside of evangelical theology to those within, the historic Reformation view of the cross is claimed to be a ‘modern’ invention from the cultural West, to be too ‘legal’ in orientation, to sanction violence, to privilege divine retributive justice over God’s love, to be a form of divine child abuse, to reduce Scripture’s polychrome presentation of the cross to a lifeless monochrome, and so on. None of these charges are new, and have been argued since the end of the sixteenth century with the rise of the Socinians and liberal theology.”