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SBC Author

The SBC is Not a Convention of Seminary Faculty

You may or may not have heard that Dr. Al Mohler stirred up the interwebs today by talking about Women Pastors, Women Preachers, and the Looming Test of the Southern Baptist Convention.

The gist of Mohler’s argument is that the Southern Baptist Convention has already fought and won the battle over complementarianism in the SBC and that the office and function of pastor, including preaching, is reserved for qualified men. In essence, it is not a Southern Baptist position to have a woman preach to men and women or to hold the office of pastor – even if that office is something other than “lead pastor.”

The Pushback

And of course, some have already come out saying that “there is no looming storm” (I’d rather not link to the article honestly). One of the arguments there is this:

“All our seminary faculty have publicly affirmed the BF&M. If anyone can clearly demonstrate where one of our seminary faculty members is teaching contrary to the BF&M, I will join you in calling for their removal.”

To which I say, “So what?” I don’t mean to imply that what our seminary faculty members hold to and teach is not important. Of course, it is important – so important it’s worth going to battle over at times. But what I am saying is, the Southern Baptist Convention is not a convention of Seminary Faculty. It is a convention of churches.

Seminary professors can say this or that, but to fully and accurately assess the health of the SBC you cannot ignore the local church. We are a convention of local churches.

It’s interesting that this is the second time in less than two weeks I’ve heard such an argument. I heard Ed Litton publicly say at an Arkansas meeting of pastors that “CRT is not a problem in the SBC.” He went on to say publicly that the idea of “CRT in the SBC is a conspiracy theory.” What I believe he meant was that CRT is not being advocated in our entities (which I certainly disagree with). But the point for this post is that Ed seems to think the health of our convention can be measured without looking at local churches.

What is the SBC?

On May 5th Adam Greenway tweeted some important questions for SBC 2021. One of the questions he said we need to clarify in Nashville is, “What is a Southern Baptist?” I won’t answer that fully here, but I cannot stress this enough: Without local churches, you do not have the Southern Baptist Convention.

The literal heartbeat of the SBC is the local church. Don’t be suckered into thinking that just because our seminaries sign off on the Baptist Faith and Message (2000) that there is no problem with egalitarianism (and CRT, btw) in the SBC.

All the seminary professors (and entity heads) involved in the SBC can affirm the BF&M. But if you have local churches ordaining female pastors and allowing women to preach to a mixed congregation, then there most certainly is a storm looming that must be resolved in Nashville.

Egalitarianism is an issue in our churches. It has been for years actually. And the only reason it’s not more widely recognized is because people want to play word games with complementarianism. One blog post actually said, “I don’t know any actively involved Southern Baptists who would consider themselves an egalitarian.” Well of course! Because the BF&M 2000 flat out denies egalitarianism if taken with any grain of sincerity. So, almost no one who loves being part of the SBC is going to openly say, “I’m an egalitarian!”

But what they are going to do are things like this:

These are examples of functional egalitarianism within the churches of the Southern Baptist Convention. And since the SBC is a convention of churches, don’t tell me there is no looming storm. Don’t tell me there is no denial of the sufficiency of Scripture in the SBC. Don’t tell me there is no moderate drift. On the issue of complementarianism, there are two Southern Baptist Conventions and it is time for us to decide the direction we will go and whether or not we will be faithful to our Lord or not.

Take the Ship

Since the churches that comprise the Southern Baptist Convention are what make the convention, as they go, so sails the SBC Ship. Some have seen the course we’ve charted and have jumped ship. Some are ready to do so even now. It’s hard to blame them. Others deny we’ve even drifted off course.

But in Nashville, we have the opportunity not to deny the drift or jump overboard, but to take the ship. Come to Nashville. Don’t let your grandchildren or great-grandchildren visit the “battlefield” one day in a hundred years and talk about how important a stand conservative Christians took, looking to find your name on the memorial, only to not see it there.

Come and stand with us. There are hills worth dying on.

Take the ship.

 

Categories
History SBC Author

A Commitment to Truth: The Twentieth Anniversary of the Baptist Faith & Message (Albert Mohler)

In this article, R. Albert Mohler, Jr. remembers, “the conservative revision of the Southern Baptist Convention’s confession of faith, the ‘Baptist Faith and Message.'”

Categories
History Podcast Politics SBC Author

Live Not by Lies: A Conversation with Author Rod Dreher about Moral Resistance in a Secular Age (Albert Mohler)

Categories
SBC Author

R. Albert Mohler, Jr. to Run for President of the Southern Baptist Convention in 2021

According to this article, “One year after announcing his willingness to be nominated for SBC president during the 2020 Southern Baptist Convention meeting set for Orlando last June, R. Albert Mohler Jr., president of Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, has announced that he will be nominated during the 2021 SBC meeting in Nashville, June 15-16.”

Categories
Critical Race Theory Critical Theory Intersectionality SBC Author

Critical Theory and the Cynical Transformation of Society: A Conversation with James Lindsay (Al Mohler)

In this video episode of Thinking in Public with Albert Mohler, R. Albert Mohler, Jr. interviews James Lindsay on Critical Theory.

Categories
Critical Race Theory Critical Theory History Homosexuality Intersectionality Racism SBC Author Social Justice

Black Lives Matter: Affirm the Sentence, Not the Movement (Albert Mohler)

In this article, R. Albert Mohler, Jr. explains how, “Black Lives Matter did not emerge merely as a sentence. Those three words function as a message and a platform making a significant political statement—one guided by Marxist ideology that seeks to revolutionize our culture and society.”

Categories
Complementarianism Gender Homosexuality SBC Author Scripture

Polyamory in Evangelical Headlines? A Signal We Can’t Miss and a Challenge We Can’t Avoid (Albert Mohler)

In this podcast episode of The Briefing, R. Albert Mohler, Jr., addresses the recent Christianity Today article on polyamory.

Categories
Abuse Complementarianism Critical Race Theory Critical Theory Intersectionality Racism SBC Author

B21 Podcast Featuring Dr. Al Mohler

Baptist21 interviews R. Albert Mohler, Jr. on:

  • The current state of the Southern Baptist Convention
  • Dr. Mohler’s candidacy for SBC President
  • The newly announced Conservative Baptist Network
  • Critical Race Theory and more.

 

Categories
Abuse Complementarianism Critical Race Theory Critical Theory Gender Homosexuality Intersectionality Racism SBC Author Scripture Social Justice

BREAKING: Southern Baptist Leaders Speak Out on Resolution 9, Founders Trailer, Abuse – Al Mohler Addresses Critical Race Theory and Intersectionality

[EDIT: An earlier headline seemed to indicate that Al Mohler had spoken to the Founders Trailer. The hosts, Ascol, and Denhollander speak to it, but not Mohler. Nor do all individuals explicitly reject Resolution 9 in the interviews. The headline has been corrected.]

Nick Eicher and Megan Basham of The World and Everything in It interview all the major players in the current controversies of the Southern Baptist Convention in this podcast episode.

Categories
Methodology SBC Author

‘The SBC is built on relationships, and we have weakened that,’ Albert Mohler on BF&M 2000, nomination, Twitter (Albert Mohler)

In this article, Southern Baptist Texan interviews R. Albert Mohler, Jr., who says, “I think we’re at an interesting and strategic moment for Southern Baptists, and I would define success as helping Southern Baptists to move in unity and in theological health towards a future that will be even more faithful, even more evangelistic, even more committed to missions. At this particular moment I think there’s a tremendous need for the affirmation of Southern Baptists and for affirmation by Southern Baptists of the convictions that shape us, and I think this is a moment of generational transition in the SBC where we’re in a season of enormous cultural challenge and I think Southern Baptists need to think and talk very openly and honestly about these issues, and to do so in the right spirit.”