Categories
New Liberalism Reform

Pastor of Hope Baptist Church Springfield, MO Announces Church’s Departure from SBC via Twitter

Joshua Jenkins, Pastor of the Hope Baptist Church of Springfield, MO announced over the weekend that his church “declared its secession from the Southern Baptist Convention” because, in his words, “The institutions [of the SBC – ed.] no longer represent us and indeed work against so much of what we stand for.”

At the time of this writing the church has offered no further explanation for their decision.

Jenkins joins Jeff Noblit, another Reformed Baptist pastor, of Grace Life Church of Muscle Shoals, whose church announced their own departure from the SBC in October of 2019.

For more on the question of whether to reform or depart the SBC from CR: Voices see:

Categories
Gender Homosexuality SBC Author Scripture

Applying Revoice’s Logic to All Sin (Jared Moore)

 

 

Part 1 

in this series shows “that Revoice teaches ‘gay Christians’ to separate their same-sex sexual attraction from their same-sex attraction, and then, to sublimate or turn their same-sex attraction to holiness.”

Part 2

argues “that Revoice’s logic concerning turning same-sex attraction to holiness is unbiblical and absurd, and the absurdity is clearly revealed when their logic is applied to abnormal sexual desires that are more prominent in the population than homosexuality.”

Part 3

shows “that frotteurism cannot be turned to holiness either. And it also shows that sexual desires that are less prominent in the population, like transvestism, cannot be turned to holiness.”

Part 4

shows “that no pattern of sinful desire, whether an unnatural pattern of sexual desire (sexual orientation) like homosexuality or a common sinful pattern of desire like adultery or greed, nothing contrary to God can be turned to holiness.”

Part 5

shows that pride and unrighteous anger are not exceptions and cannot be turned to holiness.

Categories
Methodology SBC Author

A Christian (and Baptist) Approach to the Social Order with Andrew T. Walker

Andrew T. Walker joins us for a conversation about our current societal moment and the social order.

 

– How should Christians understand the public square?

– What can believers expect from our public institutions?

– How can Christians best bring healthy change to the societal arena?

 

We get to all this and more in Ep. 5 of The CR:V Podcast!

 

Categories
Complementarianism Scripture

The Blindspot in Vision 2025

In The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, Theoden remarks to Aragorn, “The old alliances are dead.” That phrase sticks in the back of my mind as I write this post because it is not my intention to end or strain any alliances. These are not the days for conservative Christians to make enemies within their own ranks!

We are few in number as it is. May the old alliances remain alive, and may my brothers and sisters in Christ hear me out on why you won’t see me personally endorse Ronnie Floyd’s Vision 2025. It’s not that I necessarily disagree with everything. Instead, I see a glaring blind spot.

To me, the vision says we need to replace the tires, detail the car, and repair the windshield. But we’ll leave the failing transmission untouched. New tires are always great. But not if the vehicle can’t shift.

A Book of Numbers

Recently, I wrote about the 2019 SBC Annual Church Profile at ThingsAbove.Us. There I wrote,

Based on these 2019 numbers, 36.1% of Southern Baptists are in church on any given Sunday. And that’s if the 5,250,230 [attending] people were all members. Of course, some of them are guests, and children, so 36.1% is actually high, but we’ll use that number anyway.

This means that on any given Lord’s day 63.9% of those professing allegiance to Christ are missing. And this isn’t a Sunday here or there but the telling story of the entire year.

Furthermore, the trend is going in the wrong direction. Based on the numbers presented, in 2018 the percentage was at 36.5%. That means in 2019 fewer members are attending church percentage-wise than they were in 2018.

As Southern Baptist pastor, Jim Elliff, once wrote, the SBC is largely an unregenerate denomination. That is, if we take the New Testament’s admonitions about the local church seriously.

Categories
Homosexuality SBC Author Scripture

The Controversial Revoice Conference and Its Reach with Jared Moore

On this episode of the CR:V podcast Jeff Wright sets down with Dr. Jared Moore to talk about the controversy around the Revoice Conference and it’s theology – on the temptation of Christ, the nature of same sex attraction, the Reformed tradition on sin – and how it impacts evangelicalism at large and the SBC in particular.

Find it on Apple Podcasts or by clicking here.

Categories
History Scripture

Movie Night: Baptist Faith & Message 2000 Discussion at the Southern Baptist Convention

Video Description: “The culmination of the Conservative Resurgence came with the adoption of the Baptist Faith and Message 2000 at the Orlando SBC. Near the end of the discussion came a comment from a messenger that stunned the crowd and vividly illustrated why the Conservative Resurgence and this statement of faith was so necessary for Southern Baptists. On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of that Convention moment, watch and listen to history!”

Categories
Gender Scripture

The Strange Phenomenon of Women Pastors in the SBC with Nate Schlomann

On this episode of the new CR:V Podcast contributor Nate Schlomann sits down with Jeff Wright to talk about the presence of women pastors in SBC churches.

Reminder: Article V of The Baptist Faith & Message 2000 reads, in part:

“[The church’s] scriptural officers are pastors and deacons. While both men and women are gifted for service in the church, the office of pastor is limited to men as qualified by Scripture” (relevant point emphasized).

Find it on Apple Podcasts or by clicking here.

Categories
Fallacies History Methodology

Newspeak and Other Lies

In George Orwell’s dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, the fictional language imposed upon the characters by the totalitarian government is Newspeak. This language consisted of specific vocabulary and simplified grammar approved by the government that met certain ideological requirements and was meant to limit not just the speech of the masses, but their very thoughts. Newspeak imposed itself upon every facet of self-expression and free will so much so that those who are familiar with the book will remember the eventual criminalizing of ideas as “thoughtcrime.” It’s no wonder books like Nineteen Eighty-Four and Brave New World are at the top of book sales in these past few months as we’ve seen an uptick in propaganda promoting the idea of limiting words, phrases, and yes even ideas. Thoughtcrime has become a recurring joke on social media, but it rings true in a terrifying way. Even big social media platforms like Twitter have begun indoctrinating the masses with Newspeak words and phrases that are meant to include, but in actuality hinder creativity, freedom of expression, and create and sow division among people groups of different ethnicities, religions, and ideologies.

Categories
Critical Race Theory Critical Theory Gender Homosexuality Intersectionality Methodology Racism SBC Author Scripture

Critical Theory, The SBC, and The Local Church with Neil Shenvi

On this episode of the new CR:V Podcast apologist Neil Shenvi sits down with Jeff Wright to talk about Critical Theory’s impact on the world, Christianity, the Southern Baptist Convention, and the local church.

Neil offers analysis of the origins and ideology of Critical Theory (and it’s derivative, Critical Race Theory) as well as the controversial Resolution 9 coming out of the 2019 SBC Annual Meeting in Birmingham, and how church members should respond when and if they see Critical Theory making inroads into their local church – plus more!

Find it on Apple Podcasts or by clicking here.

Categories
Methodology Missions Racism

Is Preaching the Gospel Sufficient to Combat Racism?

It seems that we could generate much more light, instead of mere heat, if we would take the time to define the terms of our controversies. In the past few years, a social media divide has emerged among Christians who argue, on the one hand, that we must address racism by preaching the gospel, and those who argue, on the other hand, that while the gospel must remain central to the church, wider forms of social activism are also necessary as legitimate implications of the gospel. This common method of framing the debate is actually too crude to be helpful. What we need is a nuanced look at what, exactly, is being argued on each side.