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Controversy Critical Race Theory Critical Theory Methodology Missions Podcast Reform SBC Author Social Justice

Jared Longshore of Founders Ministries on By What Standard the Book

On Episode 14 of The CR:V Podcast Chris Bolt sits down with Jared Longshore of Founders Ministries to talk about Founders’ new book, By What Standard? – God’s World… God’s Rules.

Subscribe to the podcast on Anchor or iTunes.

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Debate History Methodology Missions Racism Reform

Dispatch from the Future on the Southern Baptist Convention Name Change

CR:V has received a leaked copy of an article planned for release during next year’s Annual Meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention.  For the purposes of documentation it is provided below.

Southern Baptists Choose Name Change Rather than Deal with Racist Past
Jonathan Sansmerit
June 14th, 2021
RNS

Nashville A denomination in crisis, reeling from the scandal of widespread sexual abuse and facing a world that has largely moved beyond their sexual values,  the Southern Baptist Convention – still the largest Protestant denomination in the world if their reported numbers are to be believed – voted today to change the name of the denomination in an effort to close the door on a legacy of racism which has dogged the denomination since its founding.

Hailed as a historic moment by its leaders, Southern Baptists hope the name change will provide a clear and final break with the pro-slavery past which led to the founding of the denomination in Augusta, Georgia in 1845.  Previous superficial efforts at distancing contemporary Southern Baptists from their racist founders have largely failed to move the needle of public perception.  SBC institutional leaders and pastors believe now that a change in branding may be the ticket to a less embarrassing future.

Reigning Southern Baptist President J.D. Greear’s tenure has seen some of Southern Baptists’ greatest challenges – the aforementioned exposure of a rampant culture of sexual abuse and cover up among SBC Churches, the refusal by a considerable number of SBC churches to honor the government’s dictates during the coronavirus pandemic, and the public relations disaster of high profile leaders supporting Donald Trump – is enthusiastic about the change.  “Southern Baptists want to be a people who love their neighbors well.  We thought we had struck the fatal blow to racism when I earlier retired the Broadus gavel [Editor – named for another Pro-Confederacy Southern Baptist founder] but after some soul-searching, conversation among our leaders, and external polling we decided that a name change was our best way to signal to the world that Southern Baptists are listening and responding.”

Stephen Balmer of Dartmoth University’s history department commented on the decision: “It is amazing to me that Southern Baptists, born in a pro-slavery moment and continuing to exist largely in the deep South, believe that a simple name change will gloss over both their denominational legacy of racism and continuing position on the wrong side of history when it comes to a progressive understanding of human sexuality.  The Southern Baptist Convention never fails to surprise.”

Harry Banking, an historian of American Religion teaching at Baylor University, called the name change  “a spasm of desperation coming from a people terrified to lose their cultural power.”  He continued, “Surely someone within the Southern Baptist Convention is self-aware enough to realize that a PR stunt like this is going to be met immediately with just the kind of scorn it deserves from a world waiting for the SBC to get serious about the backward and fundamentalist elements at the core of its being.”

Meanwhile, Ronnie Floyd, President of the SBC’s Executive Committee sees the changing of the name as a meaningful step in the denomination’s efforts to bring advance their religion into the various cultures of the world.  “Southern Baptists want to be a people on mission with Jesus and if we are going to do so in a way that is winsome and empathetic we have to make important changes in how we present ourselves to the broader world.”  However, as Reverand Dawn Hutchings has noted, the pro-missions impulse Floyd refers to is itself an expression of problematic elements within evangelicalism. “…the so-called ‘great commission’ was added to the gospel by the Christian community sometime around 325 [and ] granted white European Christians the authority to claim, seize, conquer, and ‘Christianize’ any and all lands inhabited by people who were not Christian. Colonizing became Europe’s preferred method of evangelizing and in Jesus’ name indigenous people were slaughtered or subjugated.”  Thinking of the consequences of this idea, Dr. Anthony Bradley has written that the idea of a “Great Commission” toward missions for evangelicals is driven by “a truncated view of the gospel, the kingdom, and redemption that may permanently keep evangelicalism one of America’s only predominantly white spaces.”

Vancouver-area SBC church planter Preston Spiccoli hopes that the name change eases the burden of reaching his neighborhood in the name of Christ. “Honestly, the previous name was a barrier.  ‘Southern’ carries a lot of negative connotations here in Canada and I am hopeful the change lowers the degree of difficulty for us in terms of being understandable to our neighbors.”  Spiccoli, however, finds himself struggling in a vocation fast becoming obsolete.  The pandemic quarantine has demonstrated that churches need not actually gather in a physical location, as demonstrated by SBC President Greear dissolving his own church into a collection of home-gathering fellowships (in a state with lax masking and social distancing requirements) or Nashville-area Long Hollow Baptist Church looking to accommodate online-only church members. These changes toward an online Christianity leaves church planters like Spiccoli struggling to justify his work in a post-coronavirus America.

Time will tell whether or not this name change really is the seismic shift away from the problematic past of Southern Baptists and toward the more evolved values of the people which the SBC hopes to reach with their message.  Choosing a re-branding over meaningful action against their movement’s legacy of racism nonetheless appears a strange move by a people claiming to represent Jesus’ teaching of love for one’s neighbor.

 

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Complementarianism Ecclesiology Missions Reform

Cleaning the Outside of the Cup: Why Now is not the Time to Debate a Name Change in the SBC

My three-year-old was doing a three-year-old thing at breakfast. He wouldn’t drink his milk because he said it smelled funny. Every time he put his cup to his mouth to take a sip he curled his nose and told us “This milk smells yucky!”

Finally, I did what dads do. I took the cup and gave it a sniff. Turns out, he was right! Sort of. It wasn’t the milk that actually smelled funny but the cup. The inside hadn’t been cleaned properly and it gave off a noticeable odor when you put the cup to your nose. I attribute the problem to my older children who are too much like the adolescent version of their father who thought washing dishes poorly might get him out of having to do it (as an aside I was wrong, and so are they!).

Of course, I wouldn’t have gotten my youngest to drink the milk if I would have taken a paper towel and simply shined the outside of the cup. The outside wasn’t the problem. It was the inside that was causing the issue. I could have put a sticker on the outside of the cup that said “Clean Cup!”, but alas, the inside is what needed changing.

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Controversy History Methodology Podcast Reform

Chris Bolt on How Shall We Fight in SBC Controversies

On this episode Chris Bolt delivers a message on SBC Controversies titled “How Shall We Fight”.

You can find this episode on Anchor or Apple Podcasts.

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Abortion Abuse Christology Complementarianism Controversy Critical Race Theory Critical Theory Debate Ecclesiology Fallacies Gender History Homosexuality Intersectionality Methodology Missions New Liberalism Non-SBC Podcast Prosperity Gospel Racism Reform Reviews SBC Author Scripture Social Justice

Conservative Resurgence Voices Turns One!

Conservative Resurgence Voices has posted its 200th article and turned one year old. We’d like to thank our contributors as well as our readership for a fantastic year! We look forward to many more, Lord willing.

You can click here to understand what we’re all about, and here to find the statements we affirm. If you look around the site, you’ll find articles, series, and media pertaining to theological conservatism and the Southern Baptist Convention.

Will you consider supporting us through Likes, Retweets, Shares, and Reviews? And make sure to let your pastor or church members know about us, too! You can Follow us @voices_cr on Twitter, or find us on Facebook.

You can also listen to our new podcast on Anchor here or Apple Podcasts here.

Thank you for reading and listening to Conservative Resurgence Voices!

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Methodology Reform SBC Author Social Justice

Tom Ascol on The SBC, Its Renewal, and the Work of Founders Ministries

Tom Ascol of Founders Ministries joins us for a conversation about his relationship with the SBC, whether or not the Convention needs another reformation, and how Founders Ministries is working toward a healthier Southern Baptist Convention.

Give a listen on  Ep. 6 of The CR:V Podcast!

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History Intersectionality Methodology Non-SBC Reform Social Justice

Spurgeon: If God Approves, Let Men Condemn (via Desiring God)

Spurgeon can teach us to handle controversy manfully and without compromising. His convictions, which he held to his dying day, cost him dearly. He did not practice that vice he so clearly preached against: “I think there is scarcely a Christian man or woman that has been able to go all the way to heaven and yet quietly hide himself and run from bush to bush, skulking into glory. Christianity and cowardice? What a contradiction in terms!”

Greg Morse has written an excellent article for Desiring God detailing timely conclusions about faithful Christian living and ministry from the work of Charles Spurgeon.

Give it a read here.

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New Liberalism Reform

Pastor of Hope Baptist Church Springfield, MO Announces Church’s Departure from SBC via Twitter

Joshua Jenkins, Pastor of the Hope Baptist Church of Springfield, MO announced over the weekend that his church “declared its secession from the Southern Baptist Convention” because, in his words, “The institutions [of the SBC – ed.] no longer represent us and indeed work against so much of what we stand for.”

At the time of this writing the church has offered no further explanation for their decision.

Jenkins joins Jeff Noblit, another Reformed Baptist pastor, of Grace Life Church of Muscle Shoals, whose church announced their own departure from the SBC in October of 2019.

For more on the question of whether to reform or depart the SBC from CR: Voices see:

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History New Liberalism Reform

Leave the SBC, Leave the Field

On October 21st Jeff Noblit, pastor of Grace Life Church of the Shoals and founder of Anchored in Truth Ministries announced via Twitter that he had asked his congregation to end fellowship with the Southern Baptist Convention.

Prior to this announcement making the rounds on my Twitter feed I honestly had not ever heard the name Jeff Noblit.[1]  However, I now realize he has a significant footprint in Reformed Baptist circles – the very circles that I think offer the best hope for renewal in evangelicalism broadly and the SBC in particular.  Noblit’s influence appeared not just in retweets and discernment blog posts but in the general upswell of talk (again, on my Twitter feed) of talk about a large exodus of confessional and doctrinally-minded congregations from the SBC.