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Methodology

On How We Speak of Sin

In a 2013 essay, Thabiti Anyabwile wrote regarding same-sex marriage, “Turns out that being civil about indecency actually hurts the traditional cause.” His point was that polite discourse about abominable behavior plays a role in normalizing such behavior. It is not difficult to see why that would be the case. Polite discourse minimizes and, over time, neutralizes the instinct of moral revulsion. While moral revulsion alone is not enough to sustain ethical practice over time, it is an important community-shaping element. Healthy communities express moral revulsion at that which is truly abominable, and the healthy effect of such revulsion is a natural deterrent toward said behavior within the community. People who are socialized into being appalled at what is appalling to God have the blessing of a moral compass shaped according to truth. Anyabwile’s “gag reflex” argument highlights an important component of the effects of our discourse about sin. It is entirely possible to speak of sin in a way that is technically correct, while still lacking entirely in true moral fiber, leading to the further erosion of social norms and the withering away of a protective moral revulsion.

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Abuse Gender SBC Author Scripture

Complementarianism: A Moment of Reckoning (Jonathan Leeman)

In this post series, Jonathan Leeman claims, “It seems to be a moment of reckoning for complementarianism.”

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Abuse Complementarianism Scripture

Does Complementarianism Cause Abuse? (Beth Moore)

The following is from a portion of Beth Moore’s speech, “The Courage to Confront the Crisis of Abuse in the Church” at the Caring Well conference on October 3, 2019, hosted by the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention.