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Critical Race Theory Critical Theory Gender Homosexuality Intersectionality Racism SBC Author Social Justice

Taking on the Revolutionary Program of Ibram X. Kendi (Denny Burk)

In this post, Denny Burk reviews How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi, explaining, “as American cities began to burn (including my own) due to the violence of radicals, it became clear that what we are facing is more than an academic theory. This ‘theory’ has hands and feet, it’s on the street, and it’s spreading at the popular level—including among those in evangelical churches. These ideologies are well into the mainstream, and every follower of Christ will have to reckon with them one way or the other.”

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Critical Race Theory Critical Theory History Intersectionality Racism SBC Author

Compromised? A Long Review of Tisby’s Color of Compromise (Neil Shenvi)

In this this article, Neil Shenvi reviews The Color of Compromise: The Truth about the American Church’s Complicity in Racism by Jemar Tisby, a past panel participant with the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission on the topic of racism. He warns, “If we give carte blanche to anyone waving the banner of antiracism or social justice, we may find ourselves committed to a whole host of ideas and causes whose legitimacy or wisdom we are no longer even permitted to question.”

 

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Abuse Gender Non-SBC Reviews

A New Way to Understand Men and Women in Christ? A Review of Rachel Green Miller’s Beyond Authority and Submission (Steven Wedgeworth)

In this article, non-SBC author Steven Wedgeworth reviews Beyond Authority and Submission: Woman and Men in Marriage, Church, and Society by Rachel Green Miller, which he claims, “represents a growing new voice in what might be called post-complementarian literature. In it, Miller affirms the biblical teaching of male-only ordination in the church and the husband’s leadership in the family, but she seeks to correct what she considers an intrusion of unbiblical and even pagan assumptions into the traditional Reformed and Evangelical discourse.”

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Non-SBC Social Justice

The Color of Incomplete History: A Review Article (S. Donald Fortson III)

In this article, non-SBC author S. Donald Fortson III, Professor of Church History and Practical Theology at Reformed Theological Seminary (Charlotte, NC), reviews The Color of Compromise: The Truth about the American Church’s Complicity in Racism by Jemar Tisby, a past panel participant with the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission on the topic of racism. Fortson writes,

Throughout the book, one gets the impression that the historical survey is politically motivated. A number of his sources (see endnotes) are ideologically driven books opposed to conservative political perspectives. This ideological bias explains why Tisby’s account is so one-sided – he’s attempting to make a political argument, and scholarship that doesn’t fit the narrative he’s creating is excluded.